Haircare for Aging Hair

“There is only one cure for grey hair. It was invented by Frenchmen. It is called the guillotine.”

—[the ever gracious] P.G. Wodehouse

Despite the historic frequency of such claims, the beauty industry thrives in the anti-aging market. Women, and more recently men too, are borderline frantic in their search to find the “one”; cream, or serum, or sheet-mask that will finally, finally take them back a few years. Beauty Editors from magazines like Vogue and Allure, as well as cosmetologists around the world advocate the necessity of sunscreen on a daily basis, and the regular use of eye creams before the age of 25 as a preventative. Tins of La Mer line the shelves in every prominent department store, and nearly every skincare brand has developed an iconic night cream to match its soaps and lotions.

Unfortunately, skin is not the only element of our of body that stops regenerating itself after a certain age; a pattern of hair loss begins, for most, around the age of 35, but can start greying as young as 18, for some.

We have all seen an infomercial or two for a particular pill or treatment that claims to (pseudo-)scientifically grow and renew hair to its original thickness and color at hair-raising (ahem) speeds… but the truth is, one primary cause of premature graying and fallout is a lack of wisdom concerning the choice of products we use.

Our body produces a particular hormone called DHT—dihydrotestosterone, also known as a derivative of the male hormone in our blood. It is created when testosterone comes into contact with the enzyme in the oil glands of our hair follicles, which it then attaches to, making it difficult for our amino acids to oxidize and produce melanin, and causing loss and discoloration.

Sulfate-based surfactants like Sodium Lauryl Sulphate further irritate the scalp by over-drying the remainder of oil and nutrition being produced. These days, many beauty connoisseurs as well as health-conscious individuals are aware of this risk, and will opt, therefore, for sulfate-free varieties. Sulfates, as used in soaps in general, provide the lather and ‘bubbly’ texture which is needed to cleanse the hair and skin of dirt and excess oil and bacteria. They are a commonly chosen surfactant, but by no means alone in their function.

To avoid over-drying, stripping, inflammation, and a worsening in condition of the hair and scalp, be sure to choose a shampoo that contains naturally-sourced surfactants as well as oils to impart moisture while cleansing gently. Our Yamuna Nourishing Shampoo contains naturally-sourced lauryl glucoside, commonly found in willowbark, as well as Himalayan wild cherry oil, (high in omega-3, the vitamin commonly contained in hair-growth pills and responsible for skin and nail health as well), hibiscus extract, and many other organic ingredients and oils to achieve truly clean and lustrous yet nourished hair.

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